Stay Updates: Trial on George Floyd’s Killing: NPR

Seth Bravinder, a medic who responded to the death of George Floyd last year, testified at the trial of then-officer Derek Chauvin on Thursday. Court TV over AP hide caption

Toggle labeling

Court television on AP

Seth Bravinder, a medic who responded to the death of George Floyd last year, testified at the trial of then-officer Derek Chauvin on Thursday.

Court television on AP

On the fourth day of the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, in the death of George Floyd, the jury heard from several first responders treating the black man as he lay motionless on Memorial Day.

Hennepin County medic Seth Bravinder said Floyd’s heart was “flat” in the ambulance and his team never recorded a pulse on the 46-year-old man who died in police custody.

The call that put an ambulance on the corner of 38th Street and Chicago Ave. Brought to South Minneapolis was a “Code 2 for someone with a mouth injury,” Bravinder said. When the Assistant Attorney General asked Erin Eldridge what the term “Code 2” meant, he replied that the call was “routine, no lights or sirens – normal driving” and did not imply that anyone was in a life-threatening situation.

Bravinder said the call updated to code 3 about a minute and a half later when his ambulance headed for the spot where Chauvin and other officers were holding Floyd face down on the tarmac. The crew turned on lights and sirens, he said.

Upon arrival, Bravinder said there were “several officers on the patient,” which led him to believe that a fight was ongoing. But Bravinder added that he had never seen a fight.

Bravinder checked the footage of the scene and described how he motioned for Chauvin to move so the paramedics could push Floyd onto her stretcher. Bravinder used his hands to hold Floyd’s head – the man was “limp,” he said.

From his point of view, although his partner was closer to Floyd, Bravinder said, “I saw neither breathing nor movement.” Floyd seemed unresponsive and was handcuffed, he said.

Bravinder’s partner felt the patient’s neck for a pulse and looked at his pupils, he said. When his partner returned, Bravinder asked him if the man was in cardiac arrest.

“He said, ‘I think so,'” said Bravinder.

Eldridge asked what the term “cardiac arrest” was referring to.

Bravinder responded that paramedics use it to describe “anyone unresponsive, not breathing, and currently not having a pulse”.

Their next course of action, he said, was to get Floyd to their ambulance so they could focus on resuscitating him.

When asked by Chauvin’s defense attorney Eric Nelson, Bravinder said they decided to leave, in part because the tense crowd might distract them from their work. But he said the main reason was that all of their equipment that would help them start a resuscitation process was in the ambulance.

Even after the move, Bravinder said Floyd’s condition had not improved.

“The heart monitor showed asystole,” he said. The medic described this term and said most people would understand it to mean that a person’s heart activity was “flat”.

Paramedic Derek Smith testified Thursday at the trial of Derek Chauvin for killing George Floyd in Minneapolis. Court TV over AP hide caption

Toggle labeling

Court television on AP

Paramedic Derek Smith testified Thursday at the trial of Derek Chauvin for killing George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Court television on AP

Paramedic Derek Smith, who treated Floyd alongside Bravinder, repeated much of what Bravinder said during his own testimony at the booth.

He described arriving at the crime scene and seeing Floyd’s “limp” body on the floor when three officers, including Chauvin, stayed on top of him.

At Eldridge’s behest, Smith recalled, step by step, the action he had taken that day and said, “I walked up to the person and saw that they were not moving. I saw no chest ascending or descending. ” this person. ”

“As an amateur, I thought he was dead,” he continued.

When officials finally got up from the 46-year-old black man, Smith said he had not detected a pulse, adding that he did everything he could to resuscitate Floyd, but to no avail.

He also said he electrocuted Floyd in the ambulance to try to restart his heart, adding, “As a person, I tried to give him a second chance in life.”

Nelson, who tried to prove Chauvin’s innocence by arguing that an increasingly “angry” crowd of onlookers was preventing local officials from properly looking after Floyd, also relied Thursday on the theory that it wasn’t his white client’s knee was the neck of the black man who killed him, but Floyd’s drug use.

The defense attorney asked a series of questions that led Smith to acknowledge that people who come out of an opioid overdose sometimes become violent when they wake up, presumably to justify three of the four on-site officers continuing to use their body weight to Holding Floyd even afterwards He had obviously stopped moving or reacting.

Comments are closed.